Skyline Owners Forum banner

41 - 60 of 73 Posts

·
Drift Moderator
Joined
·
1,935 Posts
Yeah, dampening harder at the back makes it easier when you are learning. Pre load should always be fairly loose for good suspension movement. Having front dampening loose and rear hard, and the tyre pressures the same; say 28 front and 40-50psi rear, makes the car very oversteery and easier to get the back out. Its quite ropey for general handling though.
Once peope get better, IME at any rate, they tend to go around the other way and look for as much grip as possible on the back and quick response on the front.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,725 Posts
Hey skyline family,

i have a question with regards to ACT clutch kits for drifting.

I have been drifting for only 3 years, am still learning but i do well in my Nissan club aka (NISOC TT) and i make them proud. i drift 2 model skylines which are r32 gts and r33 gts 4 door.

i have a drift event coming up july 5th and i need a new clutch kit for the skyline R33 4 door which has rb20det moded for quick response around corners.i'am going to strip the interior and seats tomorrow.

i plan to also use the car frequently in traffic (everyday driving), it takes me 2 hours to reach to work and 2 hours back, so something kinda easy of the ankles would be nice.

what clutch kit do yall suggest , i have to purchase a ACT kit this saturday 27th, any good suggestions.

thank you
simon
I use to run an ACT clutch in my pulsar and it took some serious abuse, a little grabby, but otherwise a dam good clutch, especially for the price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
Yeah, dampening harder at the back makes it easier when you are learning. Pre load should always be fairly loose for good suspension movement. Having front dampening loose and rear hard, and the tyre pressures the same; say 28 front and 40-50psi rear, makes the car very oversteery and easier to get the back out. Its quite ropey for general handling though.
Once peope get better, IME at any rate, they tend to go around the other way and look for as much grip as possible on the back and quick response on the front.
Yeh i'm kinda in the middle of the two extremes. my car is a daily driver so preload is 0 on the rear and little bit (about 3mm) on the front so it feels tighter on cornering. Little bit understeery in the wet though.
Issues i have is that the rear is the height i want but front can't go anylower becuase of my exhuast scraping so front and rear ride height is the same. Makes for understeer on fast corners since the softness on the rear is compressing on acceleration and making the front a little lighter. I can live with it since oversteer cures understeer and oversteer is only a clutch kick/throttle lift away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,983 Posts
Hiya :)

new to 33 and jap/turbo ownership

cars currently putting out 425bhp and needless to say i want somewhere safe to get to grips with the car and learn how to control (and exploit) her

the car also has a smoothed bodykit so im a tad worried about hitting cones or bits of paper :lol:

i want the car to stay in one piece as long as poss and want to get out on the track adn to drift days to get to grips with the car before it catches me out on the public roads as i dont know the cars (or my) limits nor do i want to learnt he hard way :p

never attended a drift day before, but are there locations without obstacles where i can follow a chalked path / marked path without the worry of hitting anything?

i wouldnt mind so much if the kit was just bolted on but the fact that its been smoothed in, im not too keen on the repair bills if/when it cracks

Ta
Chris
 

·
Drift Moderator
Joined
·
1,935 Posts
Drift What You Brung (DWYB) at Santa Pod is always the best place mate. Lex who is on here runs it, there are details as stickys in this drift section. If you really want to learn to drift then you're bound to knock up body kits at some point, but loads of people go along just to get to grips with new cars at the limit. I've taken out guys in brand new BMW M3, £100k Merc Brabus,etc :) just so they could get used to the feel of the cars for normal road driving.
The other very good option is to get some lessons with MrNick at www.driftracing.com in one of his cars. Its a particularly good choice if you dont want to do some proper drifting without worrying about your own car. He does lessons at DWYB and several other venues.
 

·
Paul0547
Joined
·
121 Posts
Going to look into that royal been spinning around out of total control in car parks for a while now lool would like to learn how to do it propperly
 

·
Belgium/Netherlands Area Rep
Joined
·
2,060 Posts
The only thing either cars needs to drift really is a 2way or welded diff. Get yourself to a DWYB day and it'll all become clear :) You can drift the skyline without fear of smashing it and then can decide how commited you are and what's best to do. My first DWYB was in my Rx7 which I insisted on drifting despite peoples advice (too much money tied up in it) the decision was made for me when the engine blew a month or so later at a track day so I bought a cheapo Bimmer and had more fun than any other car I've had. It wont be harder to learn in the skyline, its just that you'll learn things in an underpowered car that you will never learn in a powerful car. Pretty much any drifter will agree with this. Chunk had a Volvo that he learnt in I believe? Its super cheap and you can thrash hell out of it and have fun.
which beemer do you advise to start drifting ? underpowered compared to skyline i guess ... how much bhp will i need to be able to drift , or will technique allow a noob to drift a say 100bhp rwd car ?
 

·
Seasoned Member
Joined
·
21,588 Posts
a cheap beemer as in a 320, all you need to do is weld the diff and blow the back tyres up to around 55psi this way it will break traction easy, rather than struggle at say 32psi, so really 2nd gear and clutch kick it, use an open space so as not to crash or run yr pals over lol, if you can get a few cones then set them up so you can do a figure of eight and this will help you learn about transition to left and right, also while swinging from left to right you can also use the throttle to spin the back round faster, that takes practise, so have a go and post up some vids and we can offer tips or just pmsl lol,.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
Iv a question when you get chance, Everytime iv had a go at drifting (no where near as well as most off you.) The car snaps back when straightening it up i know this isnt the cars fault as iv done it in my old 3 series pck up 325 and a little go in my liner.

When you watch vids or top gear (you can see this in big chiefs vid) its just a very fluid movement in and out off the drift but when i do it it does into the drift but when straightening up the car goes from drifting to straightening up with a bit off aggresion (both hands on wheel)


Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Many factors are involved in this but most likely i would say its a combination of the driver and for sure your suspension set up, and tire pressure grip levels.

Seat time works also!

If you have adjustable suspension it could be that your damping is set too hard making the car snappy or way too soft making your grip level go up and track bite higher.

If you have just normal suspension try lowering the car to center your gravity a bit. Perhaps a bit more tire pressure also.
 

·
Drift Moderator
Joined
·
1,935 Posts
Riley - this is just normal behavior when you let off the throttle. As Lostboy says, you can adjust how hard the reaction with suspension,etc. The trick is to get used to what happens and let off the throttle progressively as the car straightens up. Very grippy cars tend to snap back really quick.

If you watch most crashes at tracks they are caused by the car fish tailing after losing the back end coming out of a corner. This is the same as you describe but more extreme. Peoples natural reaction when the back end goes is to let off the throttle completely. The causes the car to violently straighten up. It then shoots out the other side and the cycle repeats and gets worse.
 

·
GSS
Joined
·
29 Posts
Ib just been looking on driftlessons.co.uk how long would it take to be alright at it? Never done it before but one of my SGTs does it as a hobbie so got me interested

cheers
 

·
Drift Moderator
Joined
·
1,935 Posts
Hello mate, it depends on your goals really. It's certainly something you need to put time into to learn but most people manage to donut around cones, or get the back out on some corners on their first few sessions. It takes a bit more practice to start balancing the throttle to keep the back out, and to link into the next corner. Best bet is to pop along to one of the DWYB days where there's people that will be able to jump in and give you some lessons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Hi, Not long ago bought an R33 GTST looking to drift it. Just looking for some more wheels to take to dwyb sometime next month. Just wondering what would be the best tyre size/width would be for a beginner?... currently got standard GTST wheels and tyres (225's i believe).
Cheers
 

·
Thinks he can Drift
Joined
·
2,619 Posts
Hi, Not long ago bought an R33 GTST looking to drift it. Just looking for some more wheels to take to dwyb sometime next month. Just wondering what would be the best tyre size/width would be for a beginner?... currently got standard GTST wheels and tyres (225's i believe).
Cheers
Hi stu

It depends what power your running, what the weather is and driving style... Joel found he did very well changing from 17s to 16s I think it was.

A good rule of thumb is the more power your running the bigger the wheels and tyres you can/need to run. Remember you need grip when drifting :) allot of people new to the game think you want no grip so its easier to slide but you'd end up spinning.

You need grip to transition but too much grip and you won't slide. It's a tricky balence. Also remember if your running low power your probably not going to manage to spin up 18s in the dry. The wheels/tyres will just be too heavy

Try what you have, play with the tyre pressures and just go from there basically :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Got ya, gets me onto another question...
its pretty much standard apart from modified boost and going to give it a good service... am i wasting my time due to no real suspension set up, camber etc?, as ive got to sort a recovery truck and stuff out to get it there so dont want to spend all that money when if pissing in the wind if you get me?

Saw a few standard old skyline alloys so will probably get a another set of those for now and like you said see how it slides, plus will be my first drift day in my own car.
 

·
Thinks he can Drift
Joined
·
2,619 Posts
Got ya, gets me onto another question...
its pretty much standard apart from modified boost and going to give it a good service... am i wasting my time due to no real suspension set up, camber etc?, as ive got to sort a recovery truck and stuff out to get it there so dont want to spend all that money when if pissing in the wind if you get me?

Saw a few standard old skyline alloys so will probably get a another set of those for now and like you said see how it slides, plus will be my first drift day in my own car.
Nope definatly not. What exactly has the car had done to it? If i was doing my first drift day I'd happily turn the boost down ;) keep things reliable

you sure as hell aint wasting your time. Get out there! a set of lowering springs or coilovers would really help but dont worry a bit about camber and stuff. you can go for camber and extra lock and stuff later... your best of starting with a clean slate anyway in my opinion :)

the one mod i would majorly recomend is a welded or shimmed diff. It will make the car slide with allot less effort (meaning less power needed meaning more reliability)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Sound, I know i cant wait to get out there but just didnt wana ruin it by being impatient.
Yeah i will deffinately look at lowering it with some coilovers next. Are there any places that weld diffs around the midlands as like you said need to get it done?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
arrg welding diffs is dangerous
if the weld isnt good it could break up and lock the rear wheels solidly
not fun on the motorway!
ok for track

also turns into a nightmare trying to park as the wheels try and turn at the same time ruining your tyres
and leaving black marks anywhere you use regularly

go for an lsd as its the best of both world, locks up with sharp acceleration and open when
driving normally

also you can use shims to tighten up the sensitivity

Search "LSD shim skyline"


also welding diffs is for cheap crappy cars where LSD's are too expensive in relation to the cost of the car!
ie E36 beemers, mk1 MX5's, Volvo 340's
 
41 - 60 of 73 Posts
Top