Skyline Owners Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Cheese Monster
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
guys,

is there a fuse for the lambda power supply? I am not getting a 12v feed.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
25,962 Posts
im pretty sure its a no mate
 

·
Cheese Monster
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Makes sense, it seems to be controlled by the ecu.
 

·
Cheese Monster
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
OK - so if the Lambda 12v feed is controlled by the ECU, there muct be a fuse though. There is no way that the ECU is going to feed the 12v at a few amps.

Any idea where the fuse might be?
 

·
Cheese Monster
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
A lambda sensor won't need amps mate, it'll be a matter of milliamps.
Not talking about the sensor part of the lambda - I am talking about the lambda heater element that is in the three wire lambda.

One wire is 12v+, one wire is ground and one wire is output from sensor.

The Lambda sensor gets its power for it's heating element from the ECCS relay to terminal 1 and is controled by the ecu grounding terminal 3. Terminal 2 is the signal wire with an output voltage relative to the oxygen content in the exhaust.
The ECCS relay has a 10 amp fuse but i doubt it will be that if the car runs as it also covers some ecu power feeds.

My issue is that this fuse was checked and was ok.

There is still no 12v going to the Lambda though even at startup, this causes the O2 reading to be off which in turn makes the car stall when cold - it wont even Idle intill the lambda has heated up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
I see. Hmmm, shame there aren't any wiring diagrams in the service manual...

I'm not too up to scratch on this system but you mention an ECCS relay...is this a physical relay or an internal switch in the ECU? If it's an actual relay, give it a check and make sure it's switching. Or remove the relay and short the switching side which should give power to the Lambda.
 

·
Cheese Monster
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Yep, got a reply on another forum saying...

You'll need to unplug the ECCS relay and the lambda sensor and check the resistance/continuity of the wire..... if its high resistance or open circuit it's time to start chasing wires

This makes sense - I will crack on with it tonight :)

Thanks guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
True but if a contact on the relay has failed, you could end up chasing wires that are ok.

Your best bet is to remove the relay put a 12v source across the coil side of it and measure continuity on the switch side. When 12v is applied, the contacts should close and there should be very little if any resistance. If one of the contacts has failed, you will still hear the relay click but it will be open circuit.

Hope you get it sorted mate.
 

·
Cheese Monster
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
True but if a contact on the relay has failed, you could end up chasing wires that are ok.

Your best bet is to remove the relay put a 12v source across the coil side of it and measure continuity on the switch side. When 12v is applied, the contacts should close and there should be very little if any resistance. If one of the contacts has failed, you will still hear the relay click but it will be open circuit.

Hope you get it sorted mate.
Good point well made.

Ill do that also.

Cheese,

Johnny.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top