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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just wonderin if yous recomend using them in the skylines? a dont use my car much so a was wonderin if it wld be good for it
 

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R33 GTS-T "Godzuki"
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tbh if you use a good quality oil you shouldnt really need it,how often do you use it?start it up once a week and let it get nice and warm
 

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hippy
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starting a car up then turning it off again as soon as it warms up is the best way to increase bearing wear,only run the car when you need/want to,and use a decent oil,the only other thing worth doing is installing an oil pressure accumulator so that youve got oil pressure as soon as you turn the key
 

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Don´t waste your money on this. Buy some decent oil and you´ll be more than fine. A good engine oil will already have additives in it to give best possible protection. If you add other stuff to it you basically only destroy that fine balance created when oil was produced. Speak to the man above, he is the best guy to talk to! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
iv got mobil1 0-40 fully synthetic oil in it (R34 GTT), a dont know what i wld put in i just thought id ask the experts b4 i done sumthin i shudnt.
 

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However I wouldn´t personally run a 0Wxx oil in my Skyline. But then again I don´t drive my Skylines in the winter either, so...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
what is the 0-40 all about? why wldnt you run it? a dont know anythin about oils so any info is most apreciated
 

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Vendor
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Here you go, this should help explain

Viscosity is the most misunderstood aspect of oil and yet it is the most important.

Viscosity is the force required to shear (break) the oil at a certain speed and temperature. Oils work because they have viscosity; the drag of a rotating part pulls oil from a low-pressure area into a high pressure area and “floats” the surfaces apart. This is called “hydrodynamic lubrication” and crank bearings depend on it.

Oil must be capable of flowing at low temperatures, so that it gets around the engine in a fraction of a second at start-up and must protect engine components at high temperatures without evaporating or carbonising and maintain adequate oil pressure.

The numbers on every can of oil indicate its performance characteristics when new but there are many misconceptions on what these numbers actually mean.

For multigrade oils you will see two numbers (for monograde oils only one). The first is followed by a “w” and is commonly 0, 5, 10, 15 or 20. The second number is always higher than the first and is commonly 20, 30, 40, 50 or 60.

The first and second numbers ARE NOT related.

The “w” number (0, 5, 10, 15 or 20)

When multigrade oils first appeared, a low temperature test called “w” (meaning “winter” not weight) was introduced.

Using a “Cold Crank Simulator, the test measures the oils ability to flow at low temperatures.

ALL oils are THICKER at low temperatures than at high temperatures but the lower the “w” number, the quicker the oil will flow at low temperatures.

The second number (20, 30, 40, 50 or 60)

This number is known as the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) number and is measured in “Centistokes” (cst) at 100degC.

Centistokes (cst) is the measure of a fluid's resistance to flow (viscosity). It is calculated in terms of the time required for a standard quantity of fluid at a certain temperature to flow through a standard orifice. The higher the value, the thicker the oil.

An oils cst at 100degC determines it’s SAE rating within the following parameters.

SAE 20 = 5.6 to less than 9.3cst
SAE 30 = 9.3 to less than 12.5cst
SAE 40 = 12.5 to less than 16.3cst
SAE 50 = 16.3 to less than 21.9cst
SAE 60 = 21.9 to less than 26.0cst

a decent oil always falls in the middle of the spec so an SAE 40 will be around 14cst.

ALL oils labelled 40 must fall within the SAE parameters at 100degC so everything from a monograde 40 to multigrade 0w-40, 5w-40, 10w-40, 15w-40 are the same thickness at 100degC.

Summary

Cold start.

A 5w-40 will flow better than a 10w-40.
A 10w-50 will flow better than a 15w-50
A 5w-40 is the same as a 5w-30

At operating temperatures.

A 10w-50 is thicker than a 10w-40.
A 15w-50 is thicker than a 5w-40
A 0w-40 is the same as a 10w-40

Multigrades offer flexibility but manufacturers recommended viscosities should be observed unless modifications have been made that affect engine temperatures or the car is being used off road.
 

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In a non-scientific language a 0Wxx engine oil will be very thin a low temps to give maximum flow i.e. for cold starts etc. A thinner oil will normally also show lower oil pressure (this is not necessarily bad as it´s not just about pressure but flow too, some people tend to forget). However on a Skyline most people use a 10Wxx oil. Some even go for the relatively heavy 15Wxx like the sikolene Pro R. But you shouldn´t run this on a fairly standard or lightly modified car at least not if you´re not doing lots of high speed runs and track work where oil gets really up to temp. On a standard RB engine there are lots of people using a 5W40 oil as it seems to be just right. A 10Wxx will probably be fine too.

To be honest though your best of talking to the oilman as he will be able to advise you exactly on what will be best for your needs. Also he can explain the exact differences more accurately than I can.

:cheers:

EDIT: Oilman beat me to it - LOL :rofl:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks oilman for that iv saved it for future info, but to clear it up totally what is the best oil for the R34 GTT? its only occasional use and not in the winter either? only 2995 miles til the next oil change lol
 

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Big question that, what the best..! The best quality are the ester based synthetics such as the Silkolene Pro S, Motul 300v, Redline, Millers and Gulf Comp.

I would be looking at 5w-40 unless your running silly power.

Cheers

Guy
 

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and if you was running silly power what number oil would you go for?

And why?

Thanks for the info
 

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I don't have "silly" power but have a bit and mine has always run on 15-50 first recommended by tuner and confirmed by oilman(excellent products and service by nthe way).Cheers.
 

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and if you was running silly power what number oil would you go for?

And why?

Thanks for the info
Well big power is not the only factor, its down to oil temps and they often change when engine BHP is largely increased. However thease days cooling is generally very well sorted, especially on these Jap animals so unless your oil temps are getting much higher then stock there is no need to go thicker, just better for better protection.

Cheers

Guy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
all hail the oil man!!!! thanks for all the good info mate, il give you a shout when im changing the oil next time and get me sum o the good stuff you recomend
 
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