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West Sussex Area Rep
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Hop on one leg, if it's both feet you can alternate :D

More serious note sorry your in pain Dan, hope you feel better soon :)
 

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Is this where the fatty pad on the bottom of the foot breaks down? If it is, I had something similar a few years back. Feels like you're walking on bare bone.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Is this where the fatty pad on the bottom of the foot breaks down? If it is, I had something similar a few years back. Feels like you're walking on bare bone.
Doctors are looking into it and may need blood test..

Extreme situations are steroid injections to build it back up..

Hoping I have just knocked it in the gym but its been bad for a few weeks.

How long did it take to recover Banter??. any advise.
 

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Is that sharp pain in the heel? I used to get this a lot when I was younger (at school) it absolutely killed and I'd be hobbling around. I don't know what caused it and I just ended up ignoring it. I've not had it since junior school though
 

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Hope this helps

Definition
Plantar Fasciitis (often misspelt as 'Fascitis') also called "policeman's heel", is a painful inflammatory condition causing heel pain and in some cases heel spurs.

It can also result in arch pain. It is the most common form type of foot pain. At least half of Brittain's over 50 population will suffer from this condition at some stage!

Symptoms
The pain usually is felt on the underside of the heel and is often most intense with the first steps when getting out of bed in the morning. Plantar Fasciitis is presented by a sharp stabbing pain at the bottom or front of the heel bone.

In most cases, the pain is more severe when getting up, following periods of inactivity (e.g. sleep or sitting). After walking for a while the sharp pain subsides and turns into a dull ache. Heel pain can also develop after long walks, standing for hours, sports or running.

What causes Plantar Fasciitis?
The main cause of Plantar Fasciitis is over-pronation. This means that with every step we take our ankles roll inward and arches lower. Other factors that play a role include: age, recent weight gain, walking or standing on hard surfaces for long periods of time and last but not least tight muscles and ligaments. In particular tight calf muscles and achilles tendons will contribute to Plantar Fasciitis.

Over-pronation is a common condition, affecting 70% of the UK population: during walking our arches lower and with every step we take the plantar fascia (band of fibrous tissue under the foot) is being overly stretched resulting in inflammation, micro-tearing and pain at the attachment of the fascia into the heel bone. In some cases pain is also felt under the foot, in the arch area.

Continuous pulling of the fascia at the heel bone, eventually may lead to the development of a bony growth on the heel. This is called a Heel Spur. It should be noted that spurs are a mere symptom of Plantar Fasciitis; the spur itself does not cause any pain, but rather the inflamed tissue around the spur.

Summary:
Definition: Plantar Fasciitis = inflammation of the plantar fascia

Symptoms: pain in the heel, especially in the morning

Causes: over-pronation, fallen arches, tight calf muscles,

Treatment: stretching exercises and orthotics

Treatment and pain relief
There are a number of treament options availabe for Plantar Fasciitis. Some more effective than others. Medical treatments include surgery, shockwave therapy and cortisone-steroid injections. In most cases such measures are not necessary and doctors will recommend less invasive treatments options first, before committing to surgery, injections etc.

Research has shown that Plantar Fasciitis can be treated effectively by wearing orthotic insoles and by doing some simple, daily exercises. In addition, one should minimise walking or standing, allowing the inflamed tissue to heal faster. You can also take anti-inflammatory medication (e.g. ibuprofen) and apply ice onto the sore heel for about 5-10 minutes (twice a day).
 

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Seasoned Member
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Discussion Starter #8
Hope this helps

Definition
Plantar Fasciitis (often misspelt as 'Fascitis') also called "policeman's heel", is a painful inflammatory condition causing heel pain and in some cases heel spurs.

It can also result in arch pain. It is the most common form type of foot pain. At least half of Brittain's over 50 population will suffer from this condition at some stage!

Symptoms
The pain usually is felt on the underside of the heel and is often most intense with the first steps when getting out of bed in the morning. Plantar Fasciitis is presented by a sharp stabbing pain at the bottom or front of the heel bone.

In most cases, the pain is more severe when getting up, following periods of inactivity (e.g. sleep or sitting). After walking for a while the sharp pain subsides and turns into a dull ache. Heel pain can also develop after long walks, standing for hours, sports or running.

What causes Plantar Fasciitis?
The main cause of Plantar Fasciitis is over-pronation. This means that with every step we take our ankles roll inward and arches lower. Other factors that play a role include: age, recent weight gain, walking or standing on hard surfaces for long periods of time and last but not least tight muscles and ligaments. In particular tight calf muscles and achilles tendons will contribute to Plantar Fasciitis.

Over-pronation is a common condition, affecting 70% of the UK population: during walking our arches lower and with every step we take the plantar fascia (band of fibrous tissue under the foot) is being overly stretched resulting in inflammation, micro-tearing and pain at the attachment of the fascia into the heel bone. In some cases pain is also felt under the foot, in the arch area.

Continuous pulling of the fascia at the heel bone, eventually may lead to the development of a bony growth on the heel. This is called a Heel Spur. It should be noted that spurs are a mere symptom of Plantar Fasciitis; the spur itself does not cause any pain, but rather the inflamed tissue around the spur.

Summary:
Definition: Plantar Fasciitis = inflammation of the plantar fascia

Symptoms: pain in the heel, especially in the morning

Causes: over-pronation, fallen arches, tight calf muscles,

Treatment: stretching exercises and orthotics

Treatment and pain relief
There are a number of treament options availabe for Plantar Fasciitis. Some more effective than others. Medical treatments include surgery, shockwave therapy and cortisone-steroid injections. In most cases such measures are not necessary and doctors will recommend less invasive treatments options first, before committing to surgery, injections etc.

Research has shown that Plantar Fasciitis can be treated effectively by wearing orthotic insoles and by doing some simple, daily exercises. In addition, one should minimise walking or standing, allowing the inflamed tissue to heal faster. You can also take anti-inflammatory medication (e.g. ibuprofen) and apply ice onto the sore heel for about 5-10 minutes (twice a day).
Thanks mate :)

Did my research and hope the above will help ..

Never know if people on here may have a few methods that they try that can also help ...

Really dont want steriod injections in my feet :(
 
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